freelance translator. freelance project manager, organisator. likes to build bridges.
interested in China, Chinese (digital) culture & new media art, social media, translation & more.

Get It Louder 2010: Sharism Forum, Shanghai, October 22

About Sharism Forum
Sharism Forum will be held in Shanghai on October 22nd as part of the opening day of the arts and culture festival GETITLOUDER 2010. Our one-day symposium will feature thinkers, practitioners and activists whose work concerns and shapes the global movement of a new sharing culture, which has been unified under the ideology of SHARISM. The public at large is invited to join and to become a “shareholder” of this movement. The event will spark calls-to-action and demonstrate new modalities and technologies of sharing.
About Sharism
SHARISM is a Mind Revolution: The more you give, the more you get. The more you share, the more you are shared. Sharism is a belief system for our Internet Age. It is a philosophy piped through the human and technological networks of Free and Open Source software. It is the motivation behind every piece of User-Generated Content. It is the pledge of Creative Commons, to share, remix and give credit to the latest and greatest of our cultural creations. Sharism is also a mental practice that anyone can try, a daily act that beckons a future of increased social intelligence. It should not go unnoticed that a superabundance of community respect and social capital are being accumulated by precisely those who share.
Sharism is operative in the very workings of the human mind. Our model of the functional mechanism of the nervous system shows it to be one which shares activity and information via interconnected networks of neurons through patterns of feedback. This has profound implications for the creative process. Whenever you have an intention to create, you will find it easier to generate more creative ideas if you keep the sharing process firmly in mind. You can engineer a process of creative feedback to generate even more ideas in return.
The rapid emergence of social applications that can communicate and cooperate are allowing more and more people to output content from one service to another in a creative ecosystem. This interconnectedness spreads memes through multiple online social networks, which can reach a global audience and position social media as a true alternative to broadcast media. These new technologies are reviving Sharism in our closed culture. The missing pieces are open source hardware and software services that enable true freedom from top to botton in the entire communication stack.
One legal concern is that any loss of control over copyright will lead to noticeable deficits in personal wealth, or loss of creative freedom. But today’s sharing environment is more protected than you might think. Many new social applications make it easy to set terms-of-use along your sharing path (such as selecting Creative Commons licenses or privacy settings). Any infringement of those terms will be challenged not just by the law, but by your community. Your audience, who benefit form your sharing, can also be the gatekeepers of your rights.
Through emergent mobile communications technologies, we can generate higher connectivities and increase the throughput of our social links. The more open and strongly connected we are, the better the sharing environment will be for everyone involved. The more collective our intelligence, the wiser our actions will be.
Sharism promises to be the politics of the next global superpower. It will not be a country, but a new human network joined by social software. We can integrate our current and emerging democratic systems with new collaborative technologies, which will allow us to query, share and remix information for the public benefit. The future of democracy is real-time, and always online.
Sharism is the inspiration that brings it all together.
For more information,
http://sharism.org
http://freesouls.cc/essays/07-isaac-mao-sharism.html
http://freesouls.yeeyan.org/sharism-a-mind-revolution
Forum Guests
Christopher Adams
Christopher Adams is a publishing professional and free culture advocate based in Beijing and Taipei. He is a developer at Fabricatorz and works with Neoteny Labs. “Freesouls: captured and released by Joi Ito” was his first fully Creative Commons-licensed book project. Christopher is a co-founder of Sharism.org and a member of the Creative Commons Network. He graduated magna cum laude from Brown University with a degree in Cognitive Science.
Edmon Chung
Edmon Chung currently serves as the CEO for the DotAsia Organization and as Vice Chair for the Internet Society HK Chapter. Edmon is also an elected member of the Elections Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, an elected councilor of the ICANN GNSO Council, and Secretariat for the ICANN APRALO (Asia Pacific At-Large Organization).
Edmon is an inventor of patents underlying technologies for internationalized domain names (IDN) and email addresses on the Internet. He founded Neteka, Inc. in 1999, and went on to win the Most Innovative Award in the Chinese Canadian Entrepreneurship Awards in 2001. In 2000, Edmon was selected by The Globe and Mail as one of the Young Canadian Leaders.
Edmon has a Bachelor of Applied Science and Master of Engineering from the University of Toronto, and is a PhD candidate at the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics.
Li Gong
Li Gong is Chairman and CEO of Mozilla Online Ltd, the Beijing-based subsidiary of the Mozilla Corporation, the producer of the Firefox internet browser. He was Venture Partner and Head of China Office for the US venture firm Bessemer Venture Partners until 2009. He previously held positions as General Manager of MSN China at Microsoft, and General Manager of Sun Microsystems’s R&D center in China. He has co-written 3 books (published by Addison Wesley and O’Reilly) and numerous technical articles, and has received 14 US patents. Li Gong has worked as a research scientist at ORA and Stanford Research Institute (SRI), has held visiting positions at Cornell and Stanford Universities, and served as Guest Chair Professor at Tsinghua University. He has served as both Program Chair and General Chair for IEEE S&P, ACM CCS, and IEEE CSFW. Li Gong received BS and MS degrees from Tsinghua University, Beijing, and a PhD from the University of Cambridge, all in computer science.
Hu Yong
Hu Yong is associate professor at Peking University’s School of Journalism and Communication, and a well-known new media critic and Chinese Internet pioneer.
Before joining the faculty of Peking University, Hu Yong worked for a number of media sources, including China Daily, Lifeweek, China Internet Weekly and China Central Television. He is a co-founder of the Digital Forum of China, a nonprofit advocating a free and responsible Internet, as well as Chinavalue.net, a leading new media business in China.
Hu Yong is a founding director of the Communication Association of China (CAC) and China New Media Communication Association (CNMCA). His publications include Internet: The King Who Rules, and The Rising Cacophony: Personal Expression and Public Discussion in the Internet Age. He has translated several groundbreaking books on digital technology, including Nicholas Negroponte’s Being Digital, Esther Dyson’s Release 2.0 and Clay Shirky’s Here Comes Everybody. In 2000, Hu Yong was nominated for China’s list of top Internet industry figures.
Brianna Laugher
Brianna Laugher is a passionate free software and free culture enthusiast. She has been an avid editor on the Wikimedia projects, with over 10,000 edits, and was the first president of Wikimedia Australia. She has spoken at venues ranging from the National Library of Australia to the Bibliotheca Alexandrina.
Mike Linksvayer
Mike Linksvayer is vice president of Creative Commons. He holds a B.A. in economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has experience as a software developer and consultant. He joined Creative Commons as Chief technical officer in April 2003, and held that position until April 2007 when he became vice president. He also co-founded Bitzi, an early open content/open data service.
Talk description: What does it mean for “culture” to be part of the “freedom stack”? How does free culture relate to other freedom stack components? What is its progress, prospects, and can sharism make a difference? This talk is informed by the speaker’s 7+ years at Creative Commons–providing licensing and public domain tools to increase sharing in the arts, education, media, science, and beyond.
Liu Yan
Liu Yan is the CEO and event curator of Xindanwei, the first collaborative workspace and community for creatives and start ups in China. Since 2004, she has been advocating cross-culture and inter-disciplinary connection and collaboration between Europe and China through events like PICNIC and Dutch Electronic Arts Festival (DEAF). She is also the chairwoman of 3S ReUnion in Shanghai, an event for people from arts, technology and academic fields to meet and share their knowledge.
Isaac Mao
Isaac Mao is a venture capitalist, pioneering blogger, software architect, entrepreneur and researcher in learning and social technology. He is the Vice President of United Capital Investment Group and Director of the Social Brain Foundation, and advises Global Voices Online and several Web 2.0 businesses. Isaac co-founded CNBlog.org and co-organizes the Chinese Blogger Conference (CNBloggerCon). He also serves as director of the Shanghai Youth Development Foundation
Isaac is a regular keynote speaker at business and technology conferences around the globe, and has contributed to numerous commercial software projects. He earned a BS degree in Computer Science and followed an MBA training program at Shanghai Jiaotong University. From 2008 to 2009 Isaac was a Fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society
Ou Ning
Ou Ning’s cultural practices encompass multiple disciplines. As an activist, he founded U-thèque, an independent film and video organization; As an editor and graphic designer, he is known for his seminal book New Sound of Beijing; As a curator, he initiated the biennale exhibition Get It Louder (2005, 2007) and launched the sound project in China Power Station, co-organized by Serpentine Gallery and Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art; As an artist, he is known for the urban research projects such as San Yuan Li, commissioned by 50th Biennale di Venezia (2003), and Da Zha Lan, commissioned by the Kulturstiftung des Bundes. He is a frequent contributor of various magazines, books and exhibition catalogues and has lectured around the world. In 2008, he was appointed the chief curator of 2009 Shenzhen & Hong Kong Bi-city Biennale of Urbanism and Architecture(09SZHKB). In 2009, he is chosen to be the jury member of the 8th Benesse Prize at the 53rd Venice Biennale. He is now working on 2010 Get It Louder and preparing a new literary magazine Chutzpah(Tian Nan in Chinese) which will launch on January 2011. He’s based in Beijing, and is the director of Shao Foundation.
Evan Prodromou
Evan Prodromou is an American writer and programmer based in Montreal, Quebec. He is founder of Wikitravel, the free, complete, up-to-date and reliable world-wide travel guide inspired by Wikipedia and running the MediaWiki software. He is also the founder of wikiclock, Vinismo, certifi.ca, and kei.ki. He is the founder and CEO of Status.Net, the open source open microblogging software and service that powers Identi.ca and thousands of other sites.
Jon Phillips
Jon Phillips(rejon) is a developer contributing to society and building meaningful relationships. In 2002 he helped launch the open source drawing tool, Inkscape and the Open Clip Art Library, built Creative Commons‘ community and business development strategies from 2005 until 2008 and is growing the media company Fabricatorz in Beijing and San Francisco. He is community director for the open source social messaging service, Status.Net which powers Identi.ca, and is CEO of Aiki Lab in Singapore.
Jack Qiu
Dr. Jack Qiu is an associate professor at the School of Journalism and Communication, Chinese University of Hong Kong. His academic interests include Internet and society, information and communication technologies (ICTs) and class, late capitalism, globalization, grassroots media, China, and the Asian Pacific.
His publications include Working-Class Network Society: Communication Technology and the Information Have-Less in Urban China (MIT Press, 2009), Mobile Communication and Society: A Global Perspective (MIT Press, 2006, co-authored with Manuel Castells, Mireia Fernandez-Ardevol, and Araba Sey), and many chapters, articles, and review essays.
Wolfgang Spraul
Wolfgang Spraul is COO of Sharism At Work, a manufacturing company making the Ben NanoNote mini-computer and leading the copyleft hardware movement. At OpenMoko, a project to create a family of open source mobile phones including the hardware specification and the operating system, he served as the Vice President of Engineering.
Phil Tinari
Philip Tinari (b. 1979) is editor-in-chief of LEAP, a bilingual, bimonthly magazine of contemporary Chinese art and culture based in Beijing and published by Modern Media Group. Since 2007, he has also run the publishing imprint, editorial office, and translation studio office for Discourse Engineering. Tinari is a contributing editor to Artforum and adjunct professor of art criticism at the China Central Academy of Fine Arts. He serves as China advisor to Art Basel and worked previously as academic consultant to the Chinese contemporary art department at Sotheby’s. He has written and lectured widely on contemporary art in China, for publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times Magazine, Parkett, and Dushu. Recent projects include the book Hans Ulrich Obrist: The China Interviews (2009) and the exhibition The Hong Kong Seven, mounted by the Foundation Louis Vuitton at the Hong Kong Museum of Art last year. A resident of Beijing for much of the past decade, he holds an A.M. in East Asian studies from Harvard, a B.A. from the Literature Program at Duke, and was Fulbright fellow at Peking University.
Gino Yu
Dr. Gino Yu is an Associate Professor and Director of Digital Entertainment and Game Development at the School of Design at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). His research spans Design Automation, Computer Animation, Video Games, Creativity, and Consciousness with over 60 publications. Currently, his main research interests involve the application of media technologies to cultivate creativity and promote enlightened consciousness (meaningful media).
Gino Yu is co-founder of the PolyU MERECL, a commercially oriented digital entertainment laboratory that provides services to industry, and is Chairman and co-founder of the Hong Kong Digital Entertainment Association. He received his BS and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley in 1987 and 1993 respectively. He is a composer and father of three.
Zafka Zhang
Zafka Zhang is co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer of China Youthology, a boutique company focusing on brand-youth consultancy for marketing, communication, and product design targeting youth in the China market. Zafka formerly served as the senior front-page editor and columnist of China’s leading business newspaper, 21st CBH (21st Century Business Herald), and continues to write for mainstream media online and offline. He was an Advisor for the Association of Virtual Worlds and Director of Music Community and Public Relations of Creative Commons China, and was formerly head of research at HiPiHi.
Zafka is also an acclaimed sound artist and experimental musician. His art works have been published and exhibited in China, the US, Europe, and Asia. He obtained two Masters in Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology in Fudan (Shanghai) and SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London)

The Sharism Forum will be held in Shanghai on October 22nd as part of the opening day of the arts and culture festival GETITLOUDER 2010. Our one-day symposium will feature thinkers, practitioners and activists whose work concerns and shapes the global movement of a new sharing culture, which has been unified under the ideology of SHARISM. The public at large is invited to join and to become a “shareholder” of this movement. The event will spark calls-to-action and demonstrate new modalities and technologies of sharing.

About Sharism

SHARISM is a Mind Revolution: The more you give, the more you get. The more you share, the more you are shared. Sharism is a belief system for our Internet Age. It is a philosophy piped through the human and technological networks of Free and Open Source software. It is the motivation behind every piece of User-Generated Content. It is the pledge of Creative Commons, to share, remix and give credit to the latest and greatest of our cultural creations. Sharism is also a mental practice that anyone can try, a daily act that beckons a future of increased social intelligence. It should not go unnoticed that a superabundance of community respect and social capital are being accumulated by precisely those who share.

Sharism is operative in the very workings of the human mind. Our model of the functional mechanism of the nervous system shows it to be one which shares activity and information via interconnected networks of neurons through patterns of feedback. This has profound implications for the creative process. Whenever you have an intention to create, you will find it easier to generate more creative ideas if you keep the sharing process firmly in mind. You can engineer a process of creative feedback to generate even more ideas in return.

The rapid emergence of social applications that can communicate and cooperate are allowing more and more people to output content from one service to another in a creative ecosystem. This interconnectedness spreads memes through multiple online social networks, which can reach a global audience and position social media as a true alternative to broadcast media. These new technologies are reviving Sharism in our closed culture. The missing pieces are open source hardware and software services that enable true freedom from top to botton in the entire communication stack.

One legal concern is that any loss of control over copyright will lead to noticeable deficits in personal wealth, or loss of creative freedom. But today’s sharing environment is more protected than you might think. Many new social applications make it easy to set terms-of-use along your sharing path (such as selecting Creative Commons licenses or privacy settings). Any infringement of those terms will be challenged not just by the law, but by your community. Your audience, who benefit form your sharing, can also be the gatekeepers of your rights.

Through emergent mobile communications technologies, we can generate higher connectivities and increase the throughput of our social links. The more open and strongly connected we are, the better the sharing environment will be for everyone involved. The more collective our intelligence, the wiser our actions will be.

Sharism promises to be the politics of the next global superpower. It will not be a country, but a new human network joined by social software. We can integrate our current and emerging democratic systems with new collaborative technologies, which will allow us to query, share and remix information for the public benefit. The future of democracy is real-time, and always online.

Sharism is the inspiration that brings it all together.


For more information:

http://sharism.org

http://freesouls.cc/essays/07-isaac-mao-sharism.html

http://freesouls.yeeyan.org/sharism-a-mind-revolution

Forum Guests

Christopher Adams

Christopher Adams is a publishing professional and free culture advocate based in Beijing and Taipei. He is a developer at Fabricatorz and works with Neoteny Labs. “Freesouls: captured and released by Joi Ito” was his first fully Creative Commons-licensed book project. Christopher is a co-founder of Sharism.org and a member of the Creative Commons Network. He graduated magna cum laude from Brown University with a degree in Cognitive Science.

Edmon Chung

Edmon Chung currently serves as the CEO for the DotAsia Organization and as Vice Chair for the Internet Society HK Chapter. Edmon is also an elected member of the Elections Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, an elected councilor of the ICANN GNSO Council, and Secretariat for the ICANN APRALO (Asia Pacific At-Large Organization).
Edmon is an inventor of patents underlying technologies for internationalized domain names (IDN) and email addresses on the Internet. He founded Neteka, Inc. in 1999, and went on to win the Most Innovative Award in the Chinese Canadian Entrepreneurship Awards in 2001. In 2000, Edmon was selected by The Globe and Mail as one of the Young Canadian Leaders.
Edmon has a Bachelor of Applied Science and Master of Engineering from the University of Toronto, and is a PhD candidate at the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics.

Li Gong

Li Gong is Chairman and CEO of Mozilla Online Ltd, the Beijing-based subsidiary of the Mozilla Corporation, the producer of the Firefox internet browser. He was Venture Partner and Head of China Office for the US venture firm Bessemer Venture Partners until 2009. He previously held positions as General Manager of MSN China at Microsoft, and General Manager of Sun Microsystems’s R&D center in China. He has co-written 3 books (published by Addison Wesley and O’Reilly) and numerous technical articles, and has received 14 US patents. Li Gong has worked as a research scientist at ORA and Stanford Research Institute (SRI), has held visiting positions at Cornell and Stanford Universities, and served as Guest Chair Professor at Tsinghua University. He has served as both Program Chair and General Chair for IEEE S&P, ACM CCS, and IEEE CSFW. Li Gong received BS and MS degrees from Tsinghua University, Beijing, and a PhD from the University of Cambridge, all in computer science.

Hu Yong

Hu Yong is associate professor at Peking University’s School of Journalism and Communication, and a well-known new media critic and Chinese Internet pioneer.
Before joining the faculty of Peking University, Hu Yong worked for a number of media sources, including China Daily, Lifeweek, China Internet Weekly and China Central Television. He is a co-founder of the Digital Forum of China, a nonprofit advocating a free and responsible Internet, as well as Chinavalue.net, a leading new media business in China.
Hu Yong is a founding director of the Communication Association of China (CAC) and China New Media Communication Association (CNMCA). His publications include Internet: The King Who Rules, and The Rising Cacophony: Personal Expression and Public Discussion in the Internet Age. He has translated several groundbreaking books on digital technology, including Nicholas Negroponte’s Being Digital, Esther Dyson’s Release 2.0 and Clay Shirky’s Here Comes Everybody. In 2000, Hu Yong was nominated for China’s list of top Internet industry figures.

Brianna Laugher

Brianna Laugher is a passionate free software and free culture enthusiast. She has been an avid editor on the Wikimedia projects, with over 10,000 edits, and was the first president of Wikimedia Australia. She has spoken at venues ranging from the National Library of Australia to the Bibliotheca Alexandrina.

Mike Linksvayer

Mike Linksvayer is vice president of Creative Commons. He holds a B.A. in economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has experience as a software developer and consultant. He joined Creative Commons as Chief technical officer in April 2003, and held that position until April 2007 when he became vice president. He also co-founded Bitzi, an early open content/open data service.
Talk description: What does it mean for “culture” to be part of the “freedom stack”? How does free culture relate to other freedom stack components? What is its progress, prospects, and can sharism make a difference? This talk is informed by the speaker’s 7+ years at Creative Commons–providing licensing and public domain tools to increase sharing in the arts, education, media, science, and beyond.

Liu Yan

Liu Yan is the CEO and event curator of Xindanwei, the first collaborative workspace and community for creatives and start ups in China. Since 2004, she has been advocating cross-culture and inter-disciplinary connection and collaboration between Europe and China through events like PICNIC and Dutch Electronic Arts Festival (DEAF). She is also the chairwoman of 3S ReUnion in Shanghai, an event for people from arts, technology and academic fields to meet and share their knowledge.

Isaac Mao

Isaac Mao is a venture capitalist, pioneering blogger, software architect, entrepreneur and researcher in learning and social technology. He is the Vice President of United Capital Investment Group and Director of the Social Brain Foundation, and advises Global Voices Online and several Web 2.0 businesses. Isaac co-founded CNBlog.org and co-organizes the Chinese Blogger Conference (CNBloggerCon). He also serves as director of the Shanghai Youth Development Foundation.
Isaac is a regular keynote speaker at business and technology conferences around the globe, and has contributed to numerous commercial software projects. He earned a BS degree in Computer Science and followed an MBA training program at Shanghai Jiaotong University. From 2008 to 2009 Isaac was a Fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

Ou Ning

Ou Ning’s cultural practices encompass multiple disciplines. As an activist, he founded U-thèque, an independent film and video organization; As an editor and graphic designer, he is known for his seminal book New Sound of Beijing; As a curator, he initiated the biennale exhibition Get It Louder (2005, 2007) and launched the sound project in China Power Station, co-organized by Serpentine Gallery and Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art; As an artist, he is known for the urban research projects such as San Yuan Li, commissioned by 50th Biennale di Venezia (2003), and Da Zha Lan, commissioned by the Kulturstiftung des Bundes. He is a frequent contributor of various magazines, books and exhibition catalogues and has lectured around the world. In 2008, he was appointed the chief curator of 2009 Shenzhen & Hong Kong Bi-city Biennale of Urbanism and Architecture(09SZHKB). In 2009, he is chosen to be the jury member of the 8th Benesse Prize at the 53rd Venice Biennale. He is now working on 2010 Get It Louder and preparing a new literary magazine Chutzpah(Tian Nan in Chinese) which will launch on January 2011. He’s based in Beijing, and is the director of Shao Foundation.

Evan Prodromou

Evan Prodromou is an American writer and programmer based in Montreal, Quebec. He is founder of Wikitravel, the free, complete, up-to-date and reliable world-wide travel guide inspired by Wikipedia and running the MediaWiki software. He is also the founder of wikiclock, Vinismo, certifi.ca, and kei.ki. He is the founder and CEO of Status.Net, the open source open microblogging software and service that powers Identi.ca and thousands of other sites.

Jon Phillips

Jon Phillips(rejon) is a developer contributing to society and building meaningful relationships. In 2002 he helped launch the open source drawing tool, Inkscape and the Open Clip Art Library, built Creative Commons‘ community and business development strategies from 2005 until 2008 and is growing the media company Fabricatorz in Beijing and San Francisco. He is community director for the open source social messaging service, Status.Net which powers Identi.ca, and is CEO of Aiki Lab in Singapore.

Jack Qiu

Dr. Jack Qiu is an associate professor at the School of Journalism and Communication, Chinese University of Hong Kong. His academic interests include Internet and society, information and communication technologies (ICTs) and class, late capitalism, globalization, grassroots media, China, and the Asian Pacific.
His publications include Working-Class Network Society: Communication Technology and the Information Have-Less in Urban China (MIT Press, 2009), Mobile Communication and Society: A Global Perspective (MIT Press, 2006, co-authored with Manuel Castells, Mireia Fernandez-Ardevol, and Araba Sey), and many chapters, articles, and review essays.

Wolfgang Spraul

Wolfgang Spraul is COO of Sharism At Work, a manufacturing company making the Ben NanoNote mini-computer and leading the copyleft hardware movement. At OpenMoko, a project to create a family of open source mobile phones including the hardware specification and the operating system, he served as the Vice President of Engineering.

Phil Tinari

Philip Tinari (b. 1979) is editor-in-chief of LEAP, a bilingual, bimonthly magazine of contemporary Chinese art and culture based in Beijing and published by Modern Media Group. Since 2007, he has also run the publishing imprint, editorial office, and translation studio office for Discourse Engineering. Tinari is a contributing editor to Artforum and adjunct professor of art criticism at the China Central Academy of Fine Arts. He serves as China advisor to Art Basel and worked previously as academic consultant to the Chinese contemporary art department at Sotheby’s. He has written and lectured widely on contemporary art in China, for publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times Magazine, Parkett, and Dushu. Recent projects include the book Hans Ulrich Obrist: The China Interviews (2009) and the exhibition The Hong Kong Seven, mounted by the Foundation Louis Vuitton at the Hong Kong Museum of Art last year. A resident of Beijing for much of the past decade, he holds an A.M. in East Asian studies from Harvard, a B.A. from the Literature Program at Duke, and was Fulbright fellow at Peking University.

Gino Yu

Dr. Gino Yu is an Associate Professor and Director of Digital Entertainment and Game Development at the School of Design at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). His research spans Design Automation, Computer Animation, Video Games, Creativity, and Consciousness with over 60 publications. Currently, his main research interests involve the application of media technologies to cultivate creativity and promote enlightened consciousness (meaningful media).
Gino Yu is co-founder of the PolyU MERECL, a commercially oriented digital entertainment laboratory that provides services to industry, and is Chairman and co-founder of the Hong Kong Digital Entertainment Association. He received his BS and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley in 1987 and 1993 respectively. He is a composer and father of three.

Zafka Zhang

Zafka Zhang is co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer of China Youthology, a boutique company focusing on brand-youth consultancy for marketing, communication, and product design targeting youth in the China market. Zafka formerly served as the senior front-page editor and columnist of China’s leading business newspaper, 21st CBH (21st Century Business Herald), and continues to write for mainstream media online and offline. He was an Advisor for the Association of Virtual Worlds and Director of Music Community and Public Relations of Creative Commons China, and was formerly head of research at HiPiHi.
Zafka is also an acclaimed sound artist and experimental musician. His art works have been published and exhibited in China, the US, Europe, and Asia. He obtained two Masters in Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology in Fudan (Shanghai) and SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London)

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